Accelerating Alzheimer’s research

Alzheimer; News from the web:

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A team of researchers at the Human Computation Institute and Cornell University seek to understand what causes a 30% reduction of blood flow to the brain in Alzheimer’s patients.

Preliminary findings from the Schaffer-Nishimura Biomedical Engineering Lab suggest that restoring blood flow to the brain could delay the onset of Alzheimer’s and restore cognitive functioning. But there is too much data to sift through, and the blood flow imagery is too subtle for most algorithms to classify into capillaries that are either flowing or stalled. So instead, citizen scientists are helping analyze the videos in a gamified effort called “Stall Catchers” — and, through this crowdsourcing effort, are doing so at a much faster rate than the lab.

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Play the game to help research HERE

Light on Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:


In 2016, to the surprise of Alzheimer’s disease researchers across the world, a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that setting mice in front of a blinking light could clear out the characteristic protein plaques thought to be one of the roots of the disease. A recent follow up study found that sounds played at a particular frequency clearned plaques and improved cognition, as well.

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We can’t control aging, genetics. That leaves lifestyle

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Let’s start with a hard truth: While certain FDA-approved drugs can treat the symptoms, no cures or treatments have been shown to stop, slow or reverse the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. The FDA is clamping down on the makers of dozens of products, often labelled as dietary supplements, that claim otherwise. What those companies are selling, says the administration, is false hope.

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‘Alzheimer’s Stories’ choral work offers hope through music

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive, incurable brain disorder that slowly robs the sufferer of memory and cognitive functions, eventually claiming the ability to carry out even simple tasks.

Yet, it’s been noted that music can sometimes evoke responses from Alzheimer’s patients when nothing else can.

Read all about it HERE