Your gut and Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The gut microbiome has been seen to affect our overall health. From our immune system, to appetite and metabolism, our gut microbiota has many influences on our health. The microbiome is composed of bacteria, archaea, viruses, and eukaryotic microbes that reside in and on our bodies. These microbes have tremendous potential to impact our physiology, both in health and in disease. Each person has an entirely unique network of microbiota that is originally determined by one’s DNA. A person is first exposed to microorganisms as an infant, and later on, environmental exposures and diet can change one’s microbiome to be either beneficial to health or place one at greater risk for disease. New research demonstrates that changes to our gut microbiome can be linked to Alzheimer’s-like behavior.

https://www.genengnews.com/

Read all about it HERE

For Alzheimer’s Patients, Racial Disparities Threaten Detection and Treatment

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Black people are about twice as likely as White people to get the disease, and Latino residents are 1.5 times more likely to suffer from it than White people. Besides their higher risks, people of color face additional Alzheimer’s challenges: noted racial disparities in how the disease is detected and how research on it is done.

Read all about it HERE

A safer Alzheimer’s drug

Alzheimer; News from the web:

In 2018, a research group led by David Holtzman, M.D., at Washington University in St. Louis developed an antibody drug in collaboration with Denali Therapeutics that showed promise as a potential Alzheimer’s disease therapy. Now, the team has returned with mouse data suggesting the drug prospect might be a safer option than Biogen’s much-hyped aducanumab.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s impact on covid-19

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Our study provides a causal link between the Alzheimer’s disease risk factor ApoE4 and COVID-19 and explains why some (e.g., ApoE4 carriers) but not all COVID-19 patients exhibit neurological manifestations. Understanding how risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases impact COVID-19 susceptibility and severity will help us to better cope with COVID-19 and its potential long-term effects in different patient populations.”

Yanhong Shi, Ph.D., Director, Division of Stem Cell Biology, City of Hope and Study’s Co-Corresponding Author

Read all about it HERE