Subtypes of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

In a new study in JAMA Neurology, a team of neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida led by Melissa Murray, Ph.D., examined a key region of the brain and found that patterns of Alzheimer’s-related damage differed by subtype and age of onset.

The researchers say these observations could have important treatment implications.

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Alzheimer surprise drug

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Despite many promising leads, more than 120 drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease have failed. But Cambridge-based biotech company Biogen revived hope on Tuesday with its announcement that it would seek Food and Drug Administration approval for a drug it abandoned earlier this year.

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That new medicine for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The biotech world went into a full-on frenzy Tuesday when drug giant Biogen dropped this whopper: The company is reviving its Alzheimer’s drug hopeful, aducanumab, after leaving it for dead all the way back in March. In fact, it’s marching forward with a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) application to approve the drug for certain patients facing cognitive decline.

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New option in the fight against Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers have now found that slower loss of cognitive skills in people with AD correlates with higher levels of a protein that helps immune cells clear plaque-like cellular debris from the brain [1]. The efficiency of this clean-up process in the brain can be measured via fragments of the protein that shed into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This suggests that the protein, called TREM2, and the immune system as a whole, may be promising targets to help fight Alzheimer’s disease.

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No Wait, it works!

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The drug company Biogen is asking the FDA to approve one of its Alzheimer’s treatments, a sign that clinical trials have shown success for the therapy. The drug, aducanumab, is still in the experimental stages, and Biogen had thrown in the towel months ago when studies didn’t seem to show progress. The company now says higher doses may be key. An Alzheimer’s drug gaining FDA approval would be blockbuster. There are currently no effective treatments for the memory-robbing disease, which affects more than 5 million people in the U.S. alone

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A possible treatment

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. Working together with a scientific team at the Rockefeller University in New York, the investigators have shown that treatment with the oral anticoagulant dabigatran delays the appearance of Alzheimer’s disease in mice.

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Does red wine help to stave off Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Great article by Georgia Ede, MD

here is the punch line: Interventional studies of light to moderate drinking are unfortunately few and far between, therefore the risks of having a glass or two of wine with dinner are poorly understood. It is up to you to carefully consider the risks in your particular case. If you choose to drink red wine, do so because you enjoy it, rather than because of unfounded assertions that it’s good for your brain.

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Alzheimer’s and women

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The annual Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) shows that the disease progresses differently in women than it does in men. Two thirds of the approximately 5.8 mil-lion Americans living with the disease are women. That’s because women live longer than men, right? Well, that’s long been the assumption, but there’s more to it than that.

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Research takes another path

Alzheimer; News from the web:

For years researchers have been guided by one leading theory — that getting rid of a buildup of a sticky protein called amyloid would ease the mind-robbing disease. Yet drug after drug has failed. They might clear out the gunk, but they’re not stopping Alzheimer’s inevitable worsening.

The new mantra: diversify.

With more money — the government had a record $2.4 billion to spend on Alzheimer’s research this year — the focus has shifted to exploring multiple novel ways of attacking a disease now considered too complex for a one-size-fits-all solution. On the list, researchers are targeting the brain’s specialized immune system, fighting inflammation, even asking if simmering infections play a role.

Some even are looking beyond drugs, testing if electrical zaps in the brain, along a corridor of neural connections, might activate it in ways that slow Alzheimer’s damage.

https://wtop.com/

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Help Alzheimer’s research

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Recently, the Alzheimer’s Association’s created the TrialMatch program, through which 250 studies are recruiting participants. This is a way to learn about trials in your region, whether you may qualify, and how to participate.It has been referred to as a “dating service” – matching up people with clinical trials for which they are a good fit.

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Why do you get sleepy during the day?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Extreme daytime sleepiness is often a top symptom of Alzheimer’s disease but what, exactly, causes it? New research finally brings us an answer. A new study, conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and other institutions, shows that people with Alzheimer’s disease experience major brain cell loss in regions of the brain tasked with keeping us awake.

medicalnewstoday.com

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Good early results on a Alzheimer’s vaccine

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Interim results of a clinical trial on an Alzheimer’s vaccine being tested on Down syndrome individuals are promising, say researchers at the Swiss clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company AC Immune. The company’s liposomal therapeutic anti-Abeta vaccine, dubbed ACI-24, is also being evaluated in mild to moderate Alzheimer’s patients in a Phase 2 study.

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