A pill to treat Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

As powerful as the human brain is, once it’s damaged it can’t really recover completely. Now researchers at Penn State may have found a way to boost the brain’s regenerative abilities, using certain molecules to convert neighboring cells into new neurons. The technique could eventually lead to pills that treat brain injuries, stroke or Alzheimer’s disease.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s and hearing loss

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A new study says hearing may play a critical role in brain power. We often just think it’s frustrating when we can’t hear well or if you have a spouse or a loved one that you have to repeat things to a lot. But now, a new study in Alzheimer’s and Dementia shows hearing loss is linked to cognitive decline, especially if you don’t get something such as hearing aids to boost it.

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Novel approach for Alzheimers

Alzheimer; News from the web:


In a small lab in Jackson Hole, Wyo., 65-year-old Paul Cox believes he’s closing in on a treatment that might prevent Alzheimer’s disease. And ALS. And a host of other neurodegenerative diseases, for that matter. Cox, we should point out, isn’t a neurologist. He isn’t a physician of any kind. He doesn’t work at a big drug company or an academic medical center or a government laboratory. His ideas come from so far outside the mainstream of neurological research that you might think he’s crazy or deluded or worse. But then, some very credible people think he might be on to something big—which might make the improbable, quixotic story you are about to read one of the most important as well.

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Therapy Dolls for Alzheimer patients

Alzheimer; News from the web:

story

Therapy dolls have been presented to the patients because they can provide a sense of calm for when they get anxious or stressed. 

“We had dolls for the females and males,” the initiative taker said. “We chose dolls because it actually helps calm them down when they get stressed or anxiety when they start to wander. It also helps the caregiver.”

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s and the bees (yeah you read that right)

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Whether royal jelly has genuine health benefits for humans is a matter for more research, but in a study scientists have cracked one of the most enduring puzzles surrounding the milky gloop: the secret behind its queen-maker magic.

The discovery promises to have an impact far beyond the niche field of melittology. Armed with the findings, scientists are now exploring potential new treatments for wounds and disorders such as muscle wastage and neurodegenerative disease.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s and HIV

Alzheimer; News from the web:

New research finds that an HIV enzyme plays a crucial role in driving Alzheimer’s-related brain pathology by altering the APP gene. The findings warrant “immediate clinical evaluation of HIV antiretroviral therapies in people with Alzheimer’s disease,” say the authors of the study.

Read all about it HERE

Will we ever find a cure?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The New York Times has a great article today, read it in our link below.

“The field is desperate, and we all want something to work,” said Dr. Reisa Sperling, director of the Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Read all about it HERE

(our blog will be on a short break to celebrate the US Thanksgiving, back on Monday)

Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer’s disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study by an international team of researchers led by scientists at UC San Francisco and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Read all about it HERE

How language can impact Alzheimer’s trials

Alzheimer; News from the web:

According to interviews with doctors, government officials and pharmaceutical companies, few Alzheimer’s studies include medical interpreters to help patients complete the specialized neuropsychological testing component required.

One of the challenges is that clinicians and researchers have strongly cautioned against using interpreters to facilitate neuropsychological testing based on clinical experiences, observations and anecdotal evidence that they affect outcomes, according to a study published in Clinical Neuropsychology.

Read all about it HERE