Alzheimer’s and the bees (yeah you read that right)

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Whether royal jelly has genuine health benefits for humans is a matter for more research, but in a study scientists have cracked one of the most enduring puzzles surrounding the milky gloop: the secret behind its queen-maker magic.

The discovery promises to have an impact far beyond the niche field of melittology. Armed with the findings, scientists are now exploring potential new treatments for wounds and disorders such as muscle wastage and neurodegenerative disease.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s and HIV

Alzheimer; News from the web:

New research finds that an HIV enzyme plays a crucial role in driving Alzheimer’s-related brain pathology by altering the APP gene. The findings warrant “immediate clinical evaluation of HIV antiretroviral therapies in people with Alzheimer’s disease,” say the authors of the study.

Read all about it HERE

Will we ever find a cure?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The New York Times has a great article today, read it in our link below.

“The field is desperate, and we all want something to work,” said Dr. Reisa Sperling, director of the Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Read all about it HERE

(our blog will be on a short break to celebrate the US Thanksgiving, back on Monday)

Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer’s disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study by an international team of researchers led by scientists at UC San Francisco and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Read all about it HERE

How language can impact Alzheimer’s trials

Alzheimer; News from the web:

According to interviews with doctors, government officials and pharmaceutical companies, few Alzheimer’s studies include medical interpreters to help patients complete the specialized neuropsychological testing component required.

One of the challenges is that clinicians and researchers have strongly cautioned against using interpreters to facilitate neuropsychological testing based on clinical experiences, observations and anecdotal evidence that they affect outcomes, according to a study published in Clinical Neuropsychology.

Read all about it HERE

Look me in the eyes

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Results from two studies show that a new, non-invasive imaging device can see signs of Alzheimer’s disease in a matter of seconds. The researchers show that the small blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye are altered in patients with Alzheimer’s. Even patients who have a family history of Alzheimer’s but have no symptoms show these telltale signs.

Read all about it HERE

Should we look at Down’s for clues about Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

At first glance, Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, two severe brain abnormalities, may seem to have little in common. Down syndrome is a hereditary disease, the source of which has long been recognized — a triplication of chromosome 21. By contrast, the overwhelming majority of Alzheimer’s cases (more than 95 percent) do not have a clear-cut genetic source. Instead, the disease, which usually becomes clinically apparent late in life, is caused by a perplexing constellation of factors. While these have been the focus of intense study for more than 100 years, few conclusive answers have come to light.

Read all about it HERE

Overly optimistic about a cure for Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

This is the most important column I’ve ever written.  The message is quite complex–dozens of new health parameters to test for and to optimize, all of them interacting in ways that will require new training for MDs.  The message is also as simple as it can be: There is a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. You can stop reading right here, and buy two copies of Dale Bredesen’s book, one for you and one for your doctor:  The End of Alzheimer’s.

Read all about it HERE

The best defense is attack or in this case, prevention of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

It may be too late to stop Alzheimer’s in people who already have some mental decline. But what if a treatment could target the very earliest brain changes while memory and thinking skills are still intact, in hope of preventing the disease? Two big studies are going all out to try.

Clinics throughout the United States and some other countries are signing up participants — the only studies of this type enrolling healthy older people.

Read all about it HERE

Ah, this is why all those tests failed

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers at King’s College London have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease which may explain why so many drug trials have failed. The study also identifies a clinically approved drug which breaks the vicious cycle and protects against memory-loss in animal models of Alzheimer’s.

Read all about it HERE