Inflammatory bowel disease may increase risk for dementia

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A new study found that Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease were at greatest risk for two types of dementia: Alzheimer’s dementia, which is caused by damage and death to nerve cells and affects memory, thinking and behavior; and vascular dementia, which stems from conditions that block or reduce blood flow to the brain.

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Being poor impacts Alzheimer’s risk

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A new study shows that those living in the poorest neighborhoods had the highest risk for brain changes commonly related to Alzheimer’s risk. For each one-point increase on the scale of socioeconomic deprivation, there was an 8 percent increase in the odds for Alzheimer’s brain pathology. 

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Always think Positive

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Persistent negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.

In a study of people over the age of 55, researchers found repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is linked to subsequent cognitive decline, as well as the deposition of harmful brain proteins linked to Alzheimer’s.

The researchers say RNT should now be further investigated as a potential risk factor for dementia, and psychological tools, such as mindfulness or meditation, should be studied to see if these could reduce dementia risk.

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Life style changes and Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The study will test the role of lifestyle changes in Alzheimer’s disease, specifically a combination of diet, physical activity, social activity and cognitive exercises. The study is based on a similar study done in Finland, that showed benefits in thinking and memory among participants who followed a specific set of behaviors. The US version is being specifically adapted to America’s diverse population.

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Alzheimer’s and Pollution

Alzheimer; News from the web:

  • Many recent studies show that Alzheimer’s disease occurs more often in people exposed to fine particles in polluted air.
  • Such droplets, a 30th the diameter of a human hair, contain several toxic substances that can damage brain cells.
  • Particles can weaken a protective barrier around the brain and also can enter from nerves near the nose.

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Sex and Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer; News from the web:

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), over 50 million people have Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia, and these numbers are expected to double in the next 20 years. Recent studies have determined a gender predilection with the disease; as per the latest research, women have a higher risk of being affected by Alzheimer’s disease compared with men.

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A new blood test that could change things

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A simple blood test may soon be able to diagnose patients with two common forms of dementia – Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) – and tell the two apart.

Researchers at UC San Francisco analyzed the blood test in more than 300 patients and say they hope to see such a test available in doctor’s offices within five years.

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Tea, oranges and Broccoli will keep Alzheimer’s at bay

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A new study published in the journal Neurology in January 2020 concludes that increasing the intake of plant flavonols steeply reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) by up to a half. In other words, AD could be prevented in many people simply by regularly eating and drinking more foods containing these compounds such as tea, oranges and broccoli.

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New ways to look at Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

as the writer here details in a New England Journal of Medicine article, professionals, including physicians, can function competently even with clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Just as each brain is unique, so is the disease progression and continued functioning of people with Alzheimer’s. Variability in the disease’s course is the norm, with some people staying stable for years, even without treatment. Yet, while we know that two people with the same type of kidney disease or breast cancer progress differently, with Alzheimer’s disease the overwhelming belief is that everyone ends up in a wheelchair, unable to recognize family and themselves.. While this is true in some, it is not the case for all.

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Subtypes of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

In a new study in JAMA Neurology, a team of neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida led by Melissa Murray, Ph.D., examined a key region of the brain and found that patterns of Alzheimer’s-related damage differed by subtype and age of onset.

The researchers say these observations could have important treatment implications.

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