Fact Check-No evidence that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine causes Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer; News from the web:

As of this article’s publication, the COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by Pfizer-BioNTech has not been shown to cause Prion diseases or neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS). Experts say a paper circulating online does not provide legitimate evidence otherwise.

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New take home drug for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Doctors in Palm Beach County are testing a new drug that patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease can inject at home and hopefully have it repair and regenerate their brain cells.Advertisement

The clinical trial is being conducted by doctors at the Premiere Research Institute in West Palm Beach.

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Become a clinical trial volunteer

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Joe Oglesby was the highest-ranking Black newsroom executive at The Miami Herald when he announced his retirement in 2009. He and wife Linda Blash talked to us about his Alzheimer’s diagnosis and Joe’s involvement as a volunteer in an Alzheimer’s clinical trial. 

Read all about it HERE

Preventing dementia-related wandering

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The Alzheimer’s Association suggests these steps to help prevent wandering:

Have a routine for daily activities.

Identify the most likely times of day that wandering may occur. Plan activities at that time. Activities and exercise can reduce anxiety, agitation and restlessness.

Reassure the person if he or she feels lost, abandoned or disoriented. If the person with dementia wants to leave to “go home” or “go to work,” use communication focused on exploration and validation. Refrain from correcting the person. For example, “We are staying here tonight. We are safe and I’ll be with you. We can go home in the morning after a good night’s rest.”

Ensure all basic needs are met. Has the person gone to the bathroom? Is he or she thirsty or hungry?

Avoid busy places that are confusing and can cause disorientation.

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AI can help Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Have you ever wondered how Netflix knows the perfect show to recommend next? Or how Facebook suggests just the person you were looking to follow? 

Researchers have found the power of those predicting algorithms can also “predict” the biological language of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s – which could help change completely what researchers know about treating and preventing such diseases.

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13 Alzheimer’s gene variants found

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers have identified 13 variants of genes connected to Alzheimer’s disease that are new to scientists. In a study published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, the researchers report how they sequenced whole genomes of people in more than 600 families with individuals who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and searched for rare versions of genes.

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Gender and Alzheimer’s

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Mounting evidence suggests that a distinction in the chemistry or structure of women’s brains may be a factor — a distinction that may lead to a sex-based difference in the appearance and aggregation of tau and beta-amyloid proteins, key biomarkers of Alzheimer’s. In a study published this month in Brainresearchers at Lund University in Sweden have found evidence that the protein tau accumulates at a higher rate in women.

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A new approach to treat Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A new approach to treat Alzheimer’s disease, potentially targeting the root cause of memory decline

The ACT-AD and LIFT-AD trials are evaluating if a new investigational drug is safe and effective in improving symptoms of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.

The investigational drug of the ACT-AD and LIFT-AD trials is designed to:

  • Boost a repair and regenerative pathway for brain cells
  • Promote brain health and function

There may be a trial near you check it out

Read all about it HERE

Not 1 but 3 Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

What if we think of Alzheimer’s not as one disease, but three separate ones, with overlapping symptoms? Researchers behind a new study say Alzheimer’s encapsulates three distinct molecular conditions, and that a better understanding of each could be a lifeline for failed Alzheimer’s treatment efforts and future research.

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Your gut and Alzheimer’s

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The gut microbiome has been seen to affect our overall health. From our immune system, to appetite and metabolism, our gut microbiota has many influences on our health. The microbiome is composed of bacteria, archaea, viruses, and eukaryotic microbes that reside in and on our bodies. These microbes have tremendous potential to impact our physiology, both in health and in disease. Each person has an entirely unique network of microbiota that is originally determined by one’s DNA. A person is first exposed to microorganisms as an infant, and later on, environmental exposures and diet can change one’s microbiome to be either beneficial to health or place one at greater risk for disease. New research demonstrates that changes to our gut microbiome can be linked to Alzheimer’s-like behavior.

https://www.genengnews.com/

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For Alzheimer’s Patients, Racial Disparities Threaten Detection and Treatment

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Black people are about twice as likely as White people to get the disease, and Latino residents are 1.5 times more likely to suffer from it than White people. Besides their higher risks, people of color face additional Alzheimer’s challenges: noted racial disparities in how the disease is detected and how research on it is done.

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A safer Alzheimer’s drug

Alzheimer; News from the web:

In 2018, a research group led by David Holtzman, M.D., at Washington University in St. Louis developed an antibody drug in collaboration with Denali Therapeutics that showed promise as a potential Alzheimer’s disease therapy. Now, the team has returned with mouse data suggesting the drug prospect might be a safer option than Biogen’s much-hyped aducanumab.

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Alzheimer’s impact on covid-19

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Our study provides a causal link between the Alzheimer’s disease risk factor ApoE4 and COVID-19 and explains why some (e.g., ApoE4 carriers) but not all COVID-19 patients exhibit neurological manifestations. Understanding how risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases impact COVID-19 susceptibility and severity will help us to better cope with COVID-19 and its potential long-term effects in different patient populations.”

Yanhong Shi, Ph.D., Director, Division of Stem Cell Biology, City of Hope and Study’s Co-Corresponding Author

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What is the super ager’s secret?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Super-agers don’t develop the key biomarkers of Alzheimer’s, even in their 80s and 90s. Scientists try to crack the code about what protects their brains.

There are a lot of unanswered questions about Alzheimer’s, but one thing the Alzheimer’s community knows well is that getting older is the disease’s greatest known risk factor.  Generally, the buildup of beta-amyloid and tau tangles in the brain — key biomarkers of neurodegeneration —  increase as people age; abnormal levels of these proteins are linked to the onset of Alzheimer’s. 

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10 warning signs for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Karin Gallagher, of Maplewood of Marshall, was a guest on the 95.3 WBCK Morning Show and provided these warning signs.

10 Warning signs of Alzheimer’s

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life
  • Challenges in planning or solving problems
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, work, or leisure
  • Confusion with time or place
  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  • New problem with words in speaking or writing
  • Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps
  • Decreased or poor judgment
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities
  • Changes in mood and personality

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Living in a Noisy Neighborhood May Cause Alzheimer’s Disease, According to Recent Study

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Individuals who reside in louder regions are more at risk of developing Alzheimer’s, new report shows.

A sound-level spike of only 10 decibels raised the risk by 30 percent. That is the gap between breathing and whispering. It also culminated in 36 percent greater chances of moderate cognitive disability, including memory and reasoning ability, scientists said.

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Improving apathy in Alzheimer patients with brain stimulation

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Twenty Veterans with Alzheimer’s disease and apathy took part in a pilot study. Half received repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a type of brain stimulation. The others received sham stimulation, basically a placebo.

Through patient and caregiver interviews, the VA team documented “significantly greater improvement” in apathy levels in those who received brain stimulation compared with the control group. The positive effects continued up to three months.

Besides improvements in apathy, the researchers also noted “significantly greater improvement” in memory, attention, and cognition in the rTMS patients compared with the sham treatment group.

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Helping Alzheimer’s Patients Bring Back Memories

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The writer of the post in our link for today  developed an approach that allowed us to activate the neurons that store memory information, referred to as memory engrams, through optogenetics—that is, introducing a gene that is light sensitive into the memory engram cells of “Alzheimer’s” mice, then delivering blue light pulses to activate them—and measuring memory recall strength directly. To our surprise, we found comparable numbers of engram cells in normal healthy animals and Alzheimer’s animals, suggesting that the initial memory storage process is intact. Targeting the recall process in Alzheimer’s animals led to an improvement in their memory, which reached the performance level of normal animals.

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