How about Alzheimer’s villages?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A small village in Dax, France, is working to find a better way to handle the increasing caseload. In one of the first research projects of its kind, the small town houses around 110 people with early- to late-stage Alzheimer’s who are free to roam and visit the village’s supermarket, hairdresser, restaurant, café, library, and music hall. With a daily cost of €65 ($75), the program aims to allow people to exist with greater autonomy, purpose, and freedom without facing immediate financial hardship. “If it is not for everyone, it doesn’t work,” said Mathilde Charon-Burnel, a spokesperson for the experiment.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s and Covid; a connection found

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers have identified a genetic link between Alzheimer’s and severe cases of COVID-19 that may open new avenues into the treatment of both diseases.

The study, published in the journal Brain , found that the presence of a variant of the OAS1 gene increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by three to six per cent, while similar variants of the same gene increase the odds of contracting a case of severe COVID. In addition to presenting new possibilities for treatment, researchers hope this overlap may shed light on other infectious diseases and dementias.

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Alzheimer’s therapy for people with Down syndrome

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have been awarded a $4.6 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to study whether a potential Alzheimer’s disease treatment is safe and effective in improving cognitive function in young adults with Down syndrome.

Huntington Potter, PhD, professor of neurology, and Peter Pressman, MD, assistant professor of neurology, are principal investigators on the study of sargramostim, which is also know by the brand name Leukine, an FDA-approved drug with nearly 30 years of safe use in numerous patient populations.

“This is the first clinical trial in years to target cognition in people with Down syndrome,” said Potter, who is director of University of Colorado Alzheimer’s and Cognition Center. “We are breaking new ground in studying both of these disorders – Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. We hope that this therapy will greatly improve their quality of life.”

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The importance of sleep in a new study

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Disrupted sleep is common in late life, the study authors wrote, and associated with changes in cognitive function — the mental capacity for learning, thinking, reasoning, problem-solving, decision-making, remembering and paying attention.Age-related changes in sleep have also been linked with early signs of Alzheimer’s disease, depression and cardiovascular disease, so the authors investigated possible associations between self-reported sleep duration, demographic and lifestyle factors, subjective and objective cognitive function, and participants’ levels of beta amyloid.

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Yoga for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

According to a US study published on Brain Plasticity, “Compared to traditional forms of aerobic and anaerobic exercise, the relatively low-impact, modifiable nature of yoga can offer a middle ground for individuals with movement limitations, clinical diagnoses, and is particularly suitable for aging populations. Yoga’s focus on improving the self through both physical and mental practices incorporates more mindful elements absent in traditional forms of exercise.”

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Hispanics and Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Older Hispanics are about one and one-times as likely to have Alzheimer’s or other dementias as older Whites, but three out of 10 Hispanics don’t believe they will live long enough to develop dementia.

As reported in the 2021 Alzheimer’s Association Facts and Figures Report, a major issue in this population group getting treatment is that 33% of Hispanic Americans believe discrimination is a barrier to Alzheimer’s and dementia care.

Hispanics are twice as likely as Whites to say they would not see a doctor if experiencing thinking or memory problems.

Read all about it HERE

Do the survey

Alzheimer; News from the web:

As Alzheimer’s disease becomes more prevalent in the US, we at BioNews are keen to understand how this disease and its treatments affect the patients and caregivers who subscribe to our e-newsletter.  Please take 5 minutes to share your experiences and thoughts.

Your participation may help doctors, clinical research organizations, pharmaceutical companies and your community better understand more about Alzheimer’s disease.

Key mechanisms behind synapse degeneration in Alzheimer’s brain discovered

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Neurobiologists have uncovered the long-sought-after mechanisms behind the maintenance and decline of key synapses implicated in brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers identified the main components driving amyloid beta-associated synapse degeneration, which is found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. The findings suggest an alternative approach to addressing neurodegenerative disorders: protect synapses by directly blocking the toxic actions of amyloid beta.

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Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer; News from the web:

We have all misplaced our phones, forgot to respond to a text or email, or even completely forgot why we entered a room — it’s human nature. As we age, it is normal to have difficulty remembering certain things.

However, if you find yourself forgetting recent information, enough so that it dramatically disrupts your daily life, it may be time to visit your physician and have a discussion about Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s disease is much more than natural forgetfulness. It attacks brain cells, causing difficulties in communicating, learning, thinking, and reasoning.

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The Cure and the Cost

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A newly approved drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease is expected to become a multibillion-dollar expense for Medicare. By one projection, spending on the drug for Medicare’s patients could end up being higher than the budgets for the Environmental Protection Agency or NASA.

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The cost for the cure

Alzheimer; News from the web:

With the new approved drug for Alzheimer’s there is now the issue of what it will cost and how you’ll be able to afford it.

Biogen said the drug would cost approximately $56,000 for a typical year’s worth of treatment, and it said the price would not be raised for four years.

Medicare is widely expected to cover the treatment. Insurers that offer private or commercial coverage also will pay for care that doctors deem medically necessary.

That may not mean every case, though. If the treatment is proposed for a patient with advanced Alzheimer’s, and research shows the drug isn’t effective in that population, then the insurer may not pay for it.

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Finally a cure?

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A drug called aducanumab could become the first approved treatment designed to alter the course of Alzheimer’s disease rather than relieve symptoms.

But it’s unclear whether the Food and Drug Administration will approve the drug because of persistent questions about its effectiveness.

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‘Rejuvenating’ the Alzheimer’s brain

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Alzheimer’s disease is the main cause of dementia and current therapeutic strategies cannot prevent, slow down or cure the pathology. The disease is characterized by memory loss, caused by the degeneration and death of neuronal cells in several regions of the brain, including the hippocampus. Researchers have identified a small molecule that can be used to rejuvenate the brain and counteract the memory loss.

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Air quality may impact Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found a link between traffic-related air pollution and an increased risk for age-related dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Their study, based on rodent models, corroborates previous epidemiological evidence showing this association.

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Fact Check-No evidence that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine causes Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer; News from the web:

As of this article’s publication, the COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by Pfizer-BioNTech has not been shown to cause Prion diseases or neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS). Experts say a paper circulating online does not provide legitimate evidence otherwise.

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New take home drug for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Doctors in Palm Beach County are testing a new drug that patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease can inject at home and hopefully have it repair and regenerate their brain cells.Advertisement

The clinical trial is being conducted by doctors at the Premiere Research Institute in West Palm Beach.

Read all about it HERE