3 early symptoms that may indicate later Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A study found that consistently worrying about our memory—think rushing to WebMD every day to determine whether or not occasionally forgetting the route to a friend’s house means we’re destined to develop Alzheimer’s—is a sign that we may have a lower risk of receiving an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The study found that forgetting your own forgetfulness is more concerning and could be an early sign of dementia.

Read all about it HERE

When is forgetfulness dementia?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

story

“I think it’s almost universal that we forgot where we put the keys, we forgot someone’s name. That just happens all the time. If you have a precedence for those things, that’s not Alzheimer’s,” Dr. Jon Hallberg told MPR News host Tom Crann. “But if you take those things, plus you don’t remember what you said two minutes ago and someone says, ‘You just told me that,’ you’re driving and you don’t know where you are, you forget what things are used for, then some form of dementia might be happening.”

Hallberg, medical director of the University of Minnesota Physicians Mill City Clinic, said that’s when you should see a doctor.

Read all about it HERE

Know the signs and talk about it

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A survey released this week by the Alzheimer’s Association finds that nearly 90 percent of Americans say they would want others to tell them if they were showing signs of memory loss or other symptoms of dementia. And yet, nearly three quarters of Americans say having that conversation would be “challenging” for them.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s Facts and Statistics for 2019: Everything You Need to Know

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The 2019 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures Report reveals that one in 10 Americans age 65 or older have Alzheimer’s disease. While researchers look for an Alzheimer’s cure, the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) recently awarded $3.5 million to researchers focused on promising early-detection Alzheimer’s tests ranging from blood tests to eye tests that can diagnose Alzheimer’s early and affordably. The latest Alzheimer’s disease facts and statistics illustrate why researchers are determined to find a cure or halt the disease’s progression. Ahead, some interesting facts about Alzheimer’s, and your guide to the most common questions.

Read all about it HERE

Status of Alzheimer’s research

Alzheimer; News from the web:

There are roughly 326 active, recruiting or enrolling by invitation clinical trials on the elusive disease, per clinicaltrial.gov. The U.S. last year dramatically stepped up funding for Alzheimer’s disease research, from $400 million a year to over $2 billion annually, although the Alzheimer’s Association says more is needed.

The biggest problem: Scientists still don’t know the cause of Alzheimer’s.

Read all about it HERE

There is hope

Alzheimer; News from the web:

We now know early intervention could decrease the likelihood of more than one-third of dementia cases around the world. In fact, approximately 35% are attributed to nine modifiable risk factors, including high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes, hearing loss, smoking, depression, social interaction and lack of physical exercise. Therefore, monitoring which foods we eat, starting or continuing basic cardio and strength training programs, engaging the mind in the cognitive challenges and managing vascular risk factors all play demonstrable, critical roles in maintaining cognition before disease strikes.

Read all about it HERE

Risk of Alzheimer’s when it hits extended family members

Alzheimer; News from the web:

In line with previous studies, the researchers found that having one or more first-degree relatives with Alzheimer’s put people at significantly higher risk for the disease. People with one first-degree relative with Alzheimer’s were 1.73 times more likely to develop the disease. Looking further into the family tree, people with two first-degree relatives with Alzheimer’s were nearly four times more likely to develop the disease. Those with three first-degree relatives were nearly two-and-half more times likely, and those with four were almost 15 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Read all about it HERE

Accelerating Alzheimer’s research

Alzheimer; News from the web:

story

A team of researchers at the Human Computation Institute and Cornell University seek to understand what causes a 30% reduction of blood flow to the brain in Alzheimer’s patients.

Preliminary findings from the Schaffer-Nishimura Biomedical Engineering Lab suggest that restoring blood flow to the brain could delay the onset of Alzheimer’s and restore cognitive functioning. But there is too much data to sift through, and the blood flow imagery is too subtle for most algorithms to classify into capillaries that are either flowing or stalled. So instead, citizen scientists are helping analyze the videos in a gamified effort called “Stall Catchers” — and, through this crowdsourcing effort, are doing so at a much faster rate than the lab.

Read all about it HERE

Play the game to help research HERE

Light on Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:


In 2016, to the surprise of Alzheimer’s disease researchers across the world, a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that setting mice in front of a blinking light could clear out the characteristic protein plaques thought to be one of the roots of the disease. A recent follow up study found that sounds played at a particular frequency clearned plaques and improved cognition, as well.

Read all about it HERE