Home Retirement Next Avenue GET EMAIL ALERTS 7 rules to reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s and keep your brain healthy

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The good folks over at Marketwatch give us a good overview of what we can do. Here is a part of what they say:

The research on cognitive health and disease has homed in on seven pillars for living a brain-healthy lifestyle, which may in combination, slash your risk for brain-degenerative diseases.

Just keep in mind, however, that even if you performed all these pillars perfectly, it doesn’t mean you won’t get Alzheimer’s disease. Other factors, such as genetics, additional medical conditions that affect the brain and accidents, can’t always be controlled.

Read all about it HERE

They may change before you have a dianosis

Alzheimer; News from the web:

When it comes to Alzheimer’s, what happens first: beta amyloid plaques, or the visible personality and cognitive changes common with the disease? Researchers have long believed that amyloid drives neurodegeneration in the brain. But it’s possible that subtle changes in a person’s thinking abilities may actually precede the development of beta-amyloid protein, providing more clues to the complexity of the disease, according to a new study.

Read all about it HERE

New ways to look at Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

as the writer here details in a New England Journal of Medicine article, professionals, including physicians, can function competently even with clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Just as each brain is unique, so is the disease progression and continued functioning of people with Alzheimer’s. Variability in the disease’s course is the norm, with some people staying stable for years, even without treatment. Yet, while we know that two people with the same type of kidney disease or breast cancer progress differently, with Alzheimer’s disease the overwhelming belief is that everyone ends up in a wheelchair, unable to recognize family and themselves.. While this is true in some, it is not the case for all.

Read all about it HERE

Subtypes of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

In a new study in JAMA Neurology, a team of neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida led by Melissa Murray, Ph.D., examined a key region of the brain and found that patterns of Alzheimer’s-related damage differed by subtype and age of onset.

The researchers say these observations could have important treatment implications.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer surprise drug

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Despite many promising leads, more than 120 drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease have failed. But Cambridge-based biotech company Biogen revived hope on Tuesday with its announcement that it would seek Food and Drug Administration approval for a drug it abandoned earlier this year.

Read all about it HERE

That new medicine for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The biotech world went into a full-on frenzy Tuesday when drug giant Biogen dropped this whopper: The company is reviving its Alzheimer’s drug hopeful, aducanumab, after leaving it for dead all the way back in March. In fact, it’s marching forward with a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) application to approve the drug for certain patients facing cognitive decline.

Read all about it HERE

New option in the fight against Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers have now found that slower loss of cognitive skills in people with AD correlates with higher levels of a protein that helps immune cells clear plaque-like cellular debris from the brain [1]. The efficiency of this clean-up process in the brain can be measured via fragments of the protein that shed into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This suggests that the protein, called TREM2, and the immune system as a whole, may be promising targets to help fight Alzheimer’s disease.

Read all about it HERE

Check your blood sugar level

Alzheimer; News from the web:

story

Brain scientists are offering a new reason to control blood sugar levels: It might help lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

“There’s many reasons to get [blood sugar] under control,” says David Holtzman, chairman of neurology at Washington University in St. Louis. “But this is certainly one.”

Read all about it HERE