Alzheimer’s hits minorities earlier

Alzheimer; News from the web:

African-Americans have the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (13.8 percent) among people ages 65 and older, according to a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report.

That means African-Americans are about two times more likely than white Americans to have Alzheimer’s and other dementias, and Latinos are one-and-one-half times more likely. Because of population growth, Hispanic Americans will see the largest projected increase in cases.

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How language can impact Alzheimer’s trials

Alzheimer; News from the web:

According to interviews with doctors, government officials and pharmaceutical companies, few Alzheimer’s studies include medical interpreters to help patients complete the specialized neuropsychological testing component required.

One of the challenges is that clinicians and researchers have strongly cautioned against using interpreters to facilitate neuropsychological testing based on clinical experiences, observations and anecdotal evidence that they affect outcomes, according to a study published in Clinical Neuropsychology.

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Look me in the eyes

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Results from two studies show that a new, non-invasive imaging device can see signs of Alzheimer’s disease in a matter of seconds. The researchers show that the small blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye are altered in patients with Alzheimer’s. Even patients who have a family history of Alzheimer’s but have no symptoms show these telltale signs.

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Age is the greatest risk factor

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Caregivers say contributions toward research, like Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates’ recent announcement that he will invest $100 million toward studies, are encouraging. But the in-the-moment practical support that Alzheimer’s New Jersey offers is key.

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Should we look at Down’s for clues about Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

At first glance, Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, two severe brain abnormalities, may seem to have little in common. Down syndrome is a hereditary disease, the source of which has long been recognized — a triplication of chromosome 21. By contrast, the overwhelming majority of Alzheimer’s cases (more than 95 percent) do not have a clear-cut genetic source. Instead, the disease, which usually becomes clinically apparent late in life, is caused by a perplexing constellation of factors. While these have been the focus of intense study for more than 100 years, few conclusive answers have come to light.

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Overly optimistic about a cure for Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

This is the most important column I’ve ever written.  The message is quite complex–dozens of new health parameters to test for and to optimize, all of them interacting in ways that will require new training for MDs.  The message is also as simple as it can be: There is a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. You can stop reading right here, and buy two copies of Dale Bredesen’s book, one for you and one for your doctor:  The End of Alzheimer’s.

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after 40 years of study a potential solution may be close

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A potential new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is beginning a clinical trial in 100 patients in London this month. The government’s National Institute for Health Research is providing £4.5m to run the three-year trial, in the hope that a drug called miridesap will succeed where so many others have failed — and slow or even reverse patients’ progression to dementia.

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The best defense is attack or in this case, prevention of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

It may be too late to stop Alzheimer’s in people who already have some mental decline. But what if a treatment could target the very earliest brain changes while memory and thinking skills are still intact, in hope of preventing the disease? Two big studies are going all out to try.

Clinics throughout the United States and some other countries are signing up participants — the only studies of this type enrolling healthy older people.

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