Think positive to avoid Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Current research shows that genetics, high blood pressure, and smoking are all risk factors for developing dementia. But a lot of people don’t realise that there is also a relationship between mental ill-health and higher dementia risk too. Studies have shown that depression, anxiety, and post traumatic stress disorder are all linked to a higher risk of developing dementia in older age. Our recent study builds on this research by examining whether a style of thinking that is common to these mental health conditions is associated with indicators of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia.

Read all about it HERE

Early detection

Alzheimer; News from the web:

There may not be a cure yet for Alzheimer’s disease but now there is a faster way to get an early diagnosis.

Neurosciences Medical Clinic now provides a NEW service that allows for the early detection of Alzheimer’s Disease.  Science allows us to combine a series of physical, memory, imaging and genetic testing in order to determine if someone has Alzheimer’s Disease in order to prepare for what is to come later on in life.

Please Contact Neurosciences Medical Clinic at 786-600-7004 in order to learn more or follow their social media pages @NeurosciencesMedicalClinic or click on their webpage: Neurosciencesclinics.com. The clinic provides free initial screening.

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10 ways to love your brain

Alzheimer; News from the web:

This June, during Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, join the Alzheimer’s Association to help raise awareness of this devastating disease. You can start by learning and sharing 10 Ways to Love your Brain.

Nearly six million people in the United States, including 76,000 Coloradans, are living with Alzheimer’s disease. The sixth-leading cause of death and the only leading disease without a prevention, treatment or cure, Alzheimer’s kills more Americans every year than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.

When possible, combine these habits to achieve maximum benefit for the brain and body:

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Always think Positive

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Persistent negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.

In a study of people over the age of 55, researchers found repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is linked to subsequent cognitive decline, as well as the deposition of harmful brain proteins linked to Alzheimer’s.

The researchers say RNT should now be further investigated as a potential risk factor for dementia, and psychological tools, such as mindfulness or meditation, should be studied to see if these could reduce dementia risk.

Read all about it HERE

Life style changes and Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The study will test the role of lifestyle changes in Alzheimer’s disease, specifically a combination of diet, physical activity, social activity and cognitive exercises. The study is based on a similar study done in Finland, that showed benefits in thinking and memory among participants who followed a specific set of behaviors. The US version is being specifically adapted to America’s diverse population.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s and Pollution

Alzheimer; News from the web:

  • Many recent studies show that Alzheimer’s disease occurs more often in people exposed to fine particles in polluted air.
  • Such droplets, a 30th the diameter of a human hair, contain several toxic substances that can damage brain cells.
  • Particles can weaken a protective barrier around the brain and also can enter from nerves near the nose.

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s during the pandemic

Alzheimer; News from the web:

In this time of social distancing, many families and caregivers of those who suffer from Alzheimer’s or dementia are struggling.

For those who suffer from Alzheimer’s or dementia, social connection means everything. But now, in this time of social distancing, it’s a difficult concept for them to grasp

Read all about it HERE

Alzheimer’s and corona virus

Alzheimer; News from the web:

There is now a help line for all your questions

The helpline chat system can be accessed seven days a week through AFA’s website, www.alzfdn.org and clicking on the blue and white chat box in the lower right-hand corner of the page.

The helpline is open seven days a week (9 AM to 9 PM on weekdays and 9 AM to 3 PM on weekends).

Read all about it HERE

Sex and Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer; News from the web:

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), over 50 million people have Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia, and these numbers are expected to double in the next 20 years. Recent studies have determined a gender predilection with the disease; as per the latest research, women have a higher risk of being affected by Alzheimer’s disease compared with men.

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Mirrors, are they a problem?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

As Alzheimer’s causes more brain cells to die, it takes away the individual’s judgment and ability to reason that the image in front of them is his or her own reflection.

Mirrors or reflective surfaces can cause a great deal of uneasiness for those with Alzheimer’s disease because they don’t understand they are seeing a reflected image of themselves. A mirror presents an unknown person, perhaps someone from an earlier period of life, a younger version of the person or even a stalker or someone threatening from the past.

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Free virtual education for caretakers

Alzheimer; News from the web:

The Alzheimer’s Association, Georgia Chapter is offering free virtual education programs in the coming weeks to help all Georgia caregivers and their families. The Association offers a number of education programs that can help those going through Alzheimer’s and their families understand what to expect so they can be prepared to meet the changes ahead and live well for as long as possible.

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Early and remote detection is key

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Within a few years, doctors will be able to remotely evaluate patients for their risk of developing Alzheimer’s diseaseParkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia — without having to hook them up to expensive, cumbersome machines generally found only in hospitals. That’s the vision of Israeli entrepreneur Nathan Intrator, CEO of Neurosteer. “Millions of people suffer from neurodegenerative diseases, and as life expectancy goes up, that number will only increase,” 

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A new blood test that could change things

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A simple blood test may soon be able to diagnose patients with two common forms of dementia – Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) – and tell the two apart.

Researchers at UC San Francisco analyzed the blood test in more than 300 patients and say they hope to see such a test available in doctor’s offices within five years.

Read all about it HERE