How about Alzheimer’s villages?

Alzheimer; News from the web:

A small village in Dax, France, is working to find a better way to handle the increasing caseload. In one of the first research projects of its kind, the small town houses around 110 people with early- to late-stage Alzheimer’s who are free to roam and visit the village’s supermarket, hairdresser, restaurant, café, library, and music hall. With a daily cost of €65 ($75), the program aims to allow people to exist with greater autonomy, purpose, and freedom without facing immediate financial hardship. “If it is not for everyone, it doesn’t work,” said Mathilde Charon-Burnel, a spokesperson for the experiment.

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Alzheimer’s and Covid; a connection found

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers have identified a genetic link between Alzheimer’s and severe cases of COVID-19 that may open new avenues into the treatment of both diseases.

The study, published in the journal Brain , found that the presence of a variant of the OAS1 gene increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by three to six per cent, while similar variants of the same gene increase the odds of contracting a case of severe COVID. In addition to presenting new possibilities for treatment, researchers hope this overlap may shed light on other infectious diseases and dementias.

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Alzheimer’s therapy for people with Down syndrome

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have been awarded a $4.6 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to study whether a potential Alzheimer’s disease treatment is safe and effective in improving cognitive function in young adults with Down syndrome.

Huntington Potter, PhD, professor of neurology, and Peter Pressman, MD, assistant professor of neurology, are principal investigators on the study of sargramostim, which is also know by the brand name Leukine, an FDA-approved drug with nearly 30 years of safe use in numerous patient populations.

“This is the first clinical trial in years to target cognition in people with Down syndrome,” said Potter, who is director of University of Colorado Alzheimer’s and Cognition Center. “We are breaking new ground in studying both of these disorders – Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. We hope that this therapy will greatly improve their quality of life.”

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The importance of sleep in a new study

Alzheimer; News from the web:

Disrupted sleep is common in late life, the study authors wrote, and associated with changes in cognitive function — the mental capacity for learning, thinking, reasoning, problem-solving, decision-making, remembering and paying attention.Age-related changes in sleep have also been linked with early signs of Alzheimer’s disease, depression and cardiovascular disease, so the authors investigated possible associations between self-reported sleep duration, demographic and lifestyle factors, subjective and objective cognitive function, and participants’ levels of beta amyloid.

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Yoga for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer; News from the web:

According to a US study published on Brain Plasticity, “Compared to traditional forms of aerobic and anaerobic exercise, the relatively low-impact, modifiable nature of yoga can offer a middle ground for individuals with movement limitations, clinical diagnoses, and is particularly suitable for aging populations. Yoga’s focus on improving the self through both physical and mental practices incorporates more mindful elements absent in traditional forms of exercise.”

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